Not counting marine mammals, we have 57 known species in Southeast Alaska. No attempt is made in Juneaunature to describe or even list them all. A comprehensive introduction is in the Mammals section of The Nature of Southeast Alaska (Carstensen, Armstrong & O’Clair), and a more exhaustive treatment with range maps is in MacDonald & Cook’s Mammals and Amphibians of Southeast Alaska.

Let’s start with a short video clip of a shrew—either Sorex cinereus or monticolus—since I don’t want to create a special page for this sole Southeast genus in the order Soricomorpha. In July, 2012, hikers on Perseverance trail encountered an irruption of shrews. Even longtime Juneau naturalists had never seen anything like it. They moved so fast all my still shots came out blurred, so I gave up and took a movie. (Bomboid freneticism suggested the sound track—Flight of the bumblebee.)

shrew from Richard Carstensen on Vimeo.

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Common Tracks Guide

Tracking has been a core activity in Discovery programs for years.  This pocket guide provides tracking tips for common mammals and birds of Southeast, helping students, teachers, and budding naturalists read the signs of non-human inhabitants in the landscape.

 

Browse the entire booklet in the “Description” field below, or download here (2.3MB): PDF_Download
You can purchase a physical copy, or make a donation below.

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Wildlife “Out the Road”

This is a report from Richard Carstensen  to the Southeast Alaska Land Trust on habitats and wildlife use of glacially-rebounding valleys from 25 to 28-mile Glacier Highway in Juneau. They call this area “risen valleys,” and in the report you can trace animal use and habitat descriptions for this remarkable portion of Southeast Alaska. This report contains extensive habitat descriptions, photographs, and animal descriptions.

Download Here (4.2MB): PDF_Download

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Winter 2006 Newsletter, Sitka deer: Thoughts and field notes

In the Winter 2006 newsletter you’ll find an essay from Richard Carstensen on his connection to Sitka Black Tailed Deer.  You’ll also find sketches from Kathy Hocker’s field notebook, and discovery news.

Download Here (3.1MB): PDF_Download