Devotion to the future

“ ‘Sustainable growth’ is a self-contradictory term–an oxymoron. Continued, indefinite growth on this planet or any subset of the planet is a physical impossibility. Eventually, limits of some type (space, food, waste disposal, energy) must be reached; the point at which that will happen is the only aspect open to debate. . . . [Humans must] live on the income from nature’s capital rather than on the capital itself.”

G. Meffe and R. Carroll, Principles of Conservation Biology.

Young, post disturbance forests (checked here) are more suitable for human use than the ancient cedar types, lower right, that dominate today’s timber program.

Young, post disturbance forests (checked here) are more suitable for human use than the ancient cedar types, lower right, that dominate today’s timber program.

 

In 2005, Bob Christensen, Kenyon Fields and I started the Ground-truthing Project–what we called the ‘eyes and ears in the woods for the Southeast conservation community.’ Central to that project was learning what parts of our environment are most and least susceptible to human use.

My engagement in the Ground-truthing Project lasted through 2009. For Bob, however, that was just the beginning. For a taste of what he’s been up to lately, visit his website for the Sustainable Southeast Partnership, promoting resource stewardship, energy independence, food sustainability, economic self-reliance, and storytelling in Hoonah, Hydaburg, Kake, Kasaan and Sitka.

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