Below you can find information on a variety of areas in Southeast Alaska.

We describe the broader context of Southeast Alaska according to biogeographic provinces. On map below, the 3 provinces of CBJ are numbers 5, 6 and 14.

The 22 biogeographic provinces are numbered here from north to south along the mainland, then from N to S through the archipelago. Color ‘families’ group 22 provincesinto 5 clusters based upon distinctive mammal assemblages. Blue—mainland. Browns—Chichagof-Baranof. Yellow—Xutsnoowú. Greens—central & inner islands. Pinks—Tàan (POW) & southern outer islands. They’re defined in Carstensen, Schoen & Albert (2009). Provinces selected for treatment here are those with Juneau’s near-neighbor cities and villages. While the roaded portions of the CBJ (City and Borough of Juneau) are described by watershed in our Juneau section, the more remote portions of our ‘home provinces’ (for example, Tracy Arm in Taku province) are treated here.

The 22 biogeographic provinces are numbered here from north to south along the mainland, then from N to S through the archipelago. Color ‘families’ group 22 provinces into 5 clusters based upon distinctive mammal assemblages. Blue—mainland. Browns—Chichagof-Baranof. Yellow—Xutsnoowú. Greens—central & inner islands. Pinks—Tàan (POW) & southern outer islands. They’re defined in Carstensen, Schoen & Albert (2009). Provinces selected for treatment here are those with Juneau’s near-neighbor cities and villages. While the roaded portions of the CBJ (City and Borough of Juneau) are described by watershed in our Juneau section, the more remote portions of our ‘home provinces’ (for example, Tracy Arm in Taku province) are treated here.

 

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Common Flowers of Southeast Alaska

$9.00

Our laminated tri-fold pocket guide on Flowers gives you information to identify common Southeast Alaskan flowers, and can handle a rainstorm…like July.

Documenting change through repeat photography in Southeast Alaska

This report highlights historical photographs of Southeast Alaska from a variety of archives.  It focuses on repeat photography, the act of retaking historical photos and juxtaposing them with the originals in order to see changes in the land over time.  Not only does this report cover most of Southeast Alaska, it also offers insights into the past and future of photographic documentation.

Download Here (6MB): PDF_Download

Fall 2001 Newsletter, Off Trail

Our Fall 2001 newsletter includes an article by Steve Merli exploring the benefits of going off trail with kids, and an essay by Richard Carstensen on how Southeast Alaska ranks compared to neighboring ecoregions.

Download Here (3.9MB): PDF_Download

 

Habitat Use of Amphibians in Northern Southeast Alaska

This is a study of six amphibian species in Southeast Alaska.  In this study you will find detailed information on population numbers and habitats.  You will also find analyses of pond origin types, and amphibian natural history observations.  Amphibian populations are in danger across North America, and this study lays an important foundation for future studies on toads, frogs, salamanders, and newts in Southeast.

Download Here (5.9MB): PDF_Download

 

 

Intertidal Animals of Southeast Alaska

$9.00

This laminated Discovery Guide helps you identify some commonly seen animals of Southeast Alaska’s rocky intertidal inside waters. It features an insightful layout, by tidepool depth.  And it’s laminated in case the tide rises too fast.  Go out and explore the tidepools!

Just Before the Camera: the Journal of Richard Meade

This extensively documented booklet annotates the voyage of Richard Meade through Southeast Alaska, one of the first instances of Europeans in the area.  Richard Meade was the captain of a steamship that took a 4 month tour through Southeast in 1868 and 1869.  Although his visit to Southeast was marked by tremendous violence toward the native people, he left behind this journal, an incredible snapshot of Alaska’s past.  Richard Carstensen poured over the journal, adding maps, natural observations, and photographs to Meade’s writing.

Download Here (8.3MB): PDF_Download

 

Our dynamic home: Southeast Alaska then and now

In this half-hour video of still photography, Richard Carstensen looks at a rich archive of historical aerial photos taken in 1948 for mapping purposes, and compares them to present day images of Southeast Alaska communities. The result illuminates not only how the natural areas have changed, but also how our communities have changed.

From Richard:

In 2011, Cathy Pohl and I [Richard Carstensen] received a drive with 22,000 scanned air photos taken by the Navy in 1948. For the first time, cartographers and researchers in Southeast Alaska could efficiently access this extraordinary collection, studying natural and anthropogenic change in photos spanning 60 years. To celebrate, I created this 35-minute narrated slideshow comparing the 30-or-so Southeast communities, then and now.

Reading Southeast Alaska’s Landscape

$10.00

This book tells the constantly evolving story of geology in our region.  It tracks how bedrock forms, how glaciers wax and wane, and how rivers and the sea shape our land.  While the book offers a general introduction to bedrock and surficial geology, it also focuses in on regional geologic highlights.  It is a must-have for nature enthusiasts in Southeast.

 

 

The Nature of Southeast Alaska

It’s a little unorthodox for authors to review their own books, so I’ll defer on this first one. But it is probably the best place to start, for newbies or aficionados, in a literary exploration of the Alaskan rain forest. Below is a peek inside the introductory pages.