Conifer and deciduous forest types

Principle determinants of forest type in Southeast are age, soil wetness, and elevation.

forests

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Common Flowers of Southeast Alaska

$9.00

Our laminated tri-fold pocket guide on Flowers gives you information to identify common Southeast Alaskan flowers, and can handle a rainstorm…like July.

Cowee-Davies Watershed Brochure

This brochure gives you a brief introduction to the natural history of the Cowee Davies watershed.  You’ll find information about forests, fish, Tlingit history, and more.

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Documenting change through repeat photography in Southeast Alaska

This report highlights historical photographs of Southeast Alaska from a variety of archives.  It focuses on repeat photography, the act of retaking historical photos and juxtaposing them with the originals in order to see changes in the land over time.  Not only does this report cover most of Southeast Alaska, it also offers insights into the past and future of photographic documentation.

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Landmark Trees Project – Kake

This is an interpretive guide for the Hamilton Forest, a landmark tree area near Kake.  You will find descriptions of individual trees, a list of plant species, a brief natural history of the region, maps, diagrams, and more.

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Landmark Trees Project – Sitka

This Landmark Trees project report from Sitka, AK covers the Gavan Forest.  Part one of the report is a tree-by-tree description of the forest, and part two gives context for big tree forests across the region.

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Natural History of Dzantik’i Heeni Loop Trail

This guide to the Dzantik’i Heeni Loop Trail is part of a series by Richard Carstensen on Juneau watersheds.  As you walk along the trail, the guide highlights 14 points of interest illuminating local tributaries, forest succession, and recent changes after construction of Dzantik’i Heeni Middle School.

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Natural History of Juneau Trails: A Watershed Approach

$24.00

If you or someone on your gift list enjoys Juneau’s outdoors, this book is for you.  It is packed with information for the hiker, hunter, or any student of the outdoors.  Richard’s insightful text, full color maps, and dozens of recent and historic photographs explain the landforms, water features, and natural environments Juneau residents navigate every day.  Dive in for a whole new understanding of the areas you love to explore, with one of Southeast Alaska’s foremost naturalists.

Natural History of Treadwell Mine Historic Trail

This guide to Douglas Island’s Treadwell Mine area is part of a series by Richard Carstensen on Juneau watersheds. The guide’s 11 stations follow an unusual forest succession, as nature reclaims an area altered by its mining history.

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Streamwalking

$9.00

Our laminated tri-fold guide to Streamwalking is the guide you’ll want in your pocket when you’re bushwacking in the Tongass.  It covers a variety of common plants and animals of Southeast Alaskan streams and ponds.  Top your waders all you want, it can take a dunk.

Succession illustration

This info sheet explains how a forest changes as it matures from emerging forest to old growth.
Download info sheet here (330 KB):PDF_Download     Or, flip through the images below to see five stages of forest succession!

 

Alternate successional pathways

This 5-part slide show takes several repetitions to fully digest. The blocks represent an acre, about 200 feet on a side. Since spruces can reach 200 feet on stream deposits, an alluvial forest acre could be visualized as a cube 200 feet on a side. As you watch the trees rise and fall (to flooding and logging), notice that the upper, streamside forest never enters the shady, depauperate understory stage so dreaded by wildlife ecologists.

Winter 2006 Newsletter, Sitka deer: Thoughts and field notes

In the Winter 2006 newsletter you’ll find an essay from Richard Carstensen on his connection to Sitka Black Tailed Deer.  You’ll also find sketches from Kathy Hocker’s field notebook, and discovery news.

Download Here (3.1MB): PDF_Download